A Poetic Review IN GERMAN?!!

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Thoughts on Munich by Robert Harris:

 

München: Sie waren geschichtlich interessant,

Aber in diesem fall wurde ihre wichtigkeit verkannt.

 

Zugegebenerweise ein Buch über eine Tagung

macht so viel Spaß wie das Lesen einer Befragung,

 

also hinterher war es nicht äußerst schlimm.

Aber was besser ist als Robert Harris sind die Gebrüder Grimm.

 

Ihre Geschichten sind nicht basierend (ungleich München) auf Fakten,

wo ein Deutscher dem Engländer gibt die vertrauliche Akten.

 

Ja, sie versuchten den zweiten Welt Krieg zu verhindern

aber Chamberlain bevorzugte es zu schlendern

 

als zu lesen diese Dokumente. So nah! So weit weg!

Und am ende wird Deutschland doch in Polen Einmarschieren.

Prescription: A New Outlook on Life

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It’s that time of year when we all need a little medecine. This time… it’s literary 

Doctors are mythical creatures. You go to them, bleary eyed and aching, and somehow they know precisely what’s wrong. With a tap of their fingers, a magical remedy is conjured up and soon you feel in fine fettle. Said no one ever. Particularly Adam Kay, a former junior doctor, who wrote about his experience in This Is Going To Hurt. 

From the opening, he reveals his own apparent ineptitude when he was starting out as a medical student thrust straight onto the ward. But not only that, his book is revolutionary because it tells the hidden story of the NHS. Everyone hears about how it’s a dying beast; that funds are being cut and staffing is down.

NHS bill rally at Westminster

But then we scroll down to the next news story. But what does that mean in reality? Through his talk about triple shifts, more time spent working than not and even catching sleep in hospital beds, Kay does not paint an optimistic, nor reassuring, picture of the state of our National Service.

You would know. It’s like when you went to A&E with a bleeding leg, or broken arm, or a fever. Then you complained because you’d been waiting for 4 hours. Well, as it turns out, actually the medical staff weren’t punishing you by keeping you waiting. No, they were punishing themselves, relentlessly working, and if you were being pushed to the back of the queue, it should have been a relief because that meant that your problems weren’t as serious compared to those around you.

As written in the book:

“Medicine is the host who manages to keep you at their party hours after you first think about leaving.”

Perhaps that was something we all secretly knew inside us, though. That we’re never kept waiting out of spite, but due to staff shortage. But it’s like how many of life’s greatest messages aren’t surprising; it’s just that we need someone to tell us. And that’s exactly what This is Going to Hurt does. Trust me, you’ll never look at a doctor the same way again.

He also writes how the training, rigorous though it was, didn’t quite prepare Kay for the massive responsibility bestowed upon him from the outset, like having to deal with: gruesome ailments, unheard of sicknesses, births and even death. To sum it up, he said:

“It’s funny – you don’t think of doctors getting ill.’ It’s true, and I think it’s part of something bigger: patients don’t actually think of doctors as being human. It’s why they’re so quick to complain if we make a mistake or if we get cross. It’s why they’ll bite our heads off when we finally call them into our over-running clinic room at 7 p.m., not thinking that we also have homes we’d rather be at. But it’s the flip side of not wanting your doctor to be fallible, capable of getting your diagnosis wrong. They don’t want to think of medicine as a subject that anyone on the planet can learn, a career choice their mouth-breathing cousin could have made.”

You have to admit he’s onto something there.

There are of course hilarious anecdotes- of patients who enter the hospital for rather embarrassing reasons- and then somewhat inherently sad ones too. Like how the hospital staff have to pay extortionate parking prices. That sounds minor and trivial, but it meant that their losing 50% of their wage to a machine which, at the end of the day, would earn more than even them. And that machine doesn’t even know which way to put on hospital scrubs.

Oh, and a final thing I learnt from the book? Thanks to Kay’s detailed descriptions from his time working at Obstetrics and Gynaecology: that childbirth is brutal and somewhat disgusting.

 

“If you could have dinner with…”

MARY SHELLEY

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A teenage literary giant, there is nothing that isn’t impressive about Shelley. Whether it’s the famous tale about the creation of Frankenstein, her tumultuous relationship with Percy or even the fact that she was a woman navigating here way through an overbearingly sexist industry (hence the pseudonym), it’s hard to say how she wouldn’t be thoroughly engaging. Also, she kept Percy’s heart wrapped in one of his poems. Now that is someone who I would like to meet.

NEIL GAIMAN

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Neil Gaiman is a bit of a legend. So much so that he writes free short stories on his website (check it out here) and seems to be a half-ghostly, half-firmly entrenched in reality type of guy. I don’t quite know why he appears to be so intriguing, although I suppose the subject matter of his books speak for themselves.

TERRY PRATCHETT

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Come on. Even if you haven’t read any T.P books, wouldn’t you want to have met him based on this picture? I was so keen when was I younger to tell Pratchett how much I loved his work that I even wrote him a letter and included a hand-drawn dragon. (Which I was very proud of, by the way). Unfortunately he never wrote back, although some vaguely pessimistic part of me did expect never to hear from him again anyway. It’s a real shame, but at least I can say that I tried. That said, Pratchett was a thoroughly engaging man; before becoming a writer he worked at a nuclear plant, and he seemed like the kind of man who was not only is witty, but had his fair share of outrageous anecdotes to tell.

DAPHNE DU MAURIER

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Not only has her book Rebecca never gone out of print, but du Maurier herself was quite the character. Her father was so desperate for a son that he made cut her hair short and adopt a male persona, which she called “Eric Avon”. Given that her father was an actor and indeed encouraged this behaviour, no one thought it all bizarre and it was only at adolescence that ‘Eric’ was sidelined. Then, in 1925, as if to prove a point she went a finishing school in France. A proper finishing school! I would just dream to hear the late-night stories that they shared at such a classic institution late at night… because I firmly believe that boarding school isn’t as innocent as it seems!

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

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This is two-fold:

Firstly, did Shakespeare exist? If I sent him a memo and he didn’t turn up, then I presume not, and the whole world be shaken. (Maybe…) Or he just rejected me. Which would be an equally calamatous event compared with him not existing at all.

Secondly, if Shakespeare did turn up for 17th century (vegan) pies outside the Globe, then it would be fascinating in itself because Shakespeare’s life had been rather mixed. He came from a poor background and somehow managed to establish a life for himself amongst the literary elite, and even ended up working for the King. Asking him about his intention for the longevity for the plays (and would he consider prose?) would also feature high on the agenda.

ROALD DAHL

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Does this even need explaining? He evidently prefers children though (adults are regarded with great disdain in the majority of his books), so maybe I would have to de-age before somehow meeting him to have the richest experience possible. I don’t even think I would say anything, in all honesty (and definitely not the “where do you get your inspiration from” type-question). But to be in the presence of such an influential man would be enough.

THE BIBLE WRITER(S)

 

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This would be more altruistic than anything but at least it would put a lot of people’s minds at rest depending on who turned up… it could radically alter modern society as we know it!

A.A.GILL

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The appeal of meeting A.A.Gill is rather simple one. Renowned for his travel writing, he had seen the world and such a wealth of experience to draw upon that coupled with biting humour it would have been the most intriguing of evenings. There is still rightly so much melancholy and intense sadness surrounding his recent death in the literary and wider community. It came as such a shock to everyone, and the perhaps saddest things of all (after the loss to his family), is that the words of trips he now can never make, unwritten, are permanently hanging in oblivion.

Liebster Award 2018

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Right, I’m starting this thread of the Liebster Award, (find out more about it here,) so I don’t have anyone to thank for nominating me, but I’m going to give a nod of recognition to a blog called  A Guy Called Bloke  because I found the awesome questions (which I answered below,) from there.

Why I’m passionate about blogging:

For me, blogging all started because I wanted a platform to record how many books I had read, and what I thought of them. Soon it became my own corner of the internet and somewhere I knew that I could voice my thoughts and opinions- just for my own satisfaction. This was mainly because when I started the blog there were no English societies or book clubs for me attend, and most young teens don’t find a rendition of The Secret History that attractive a prospect. Fast forward a few years, and I am part of all sort of literature related activities, but I also love to keep my blog alongside to record reads, reach out to others and review current affairs through the lens of my personal opinion.

10 Random Facts about Me

1. I have fenced foil for the England team.

2. I was once the part of a tree in a German play.

3. I own three pairs of Doc Martens.

4. I bake a wonderful chocolate chip banana bread.

5. I played Grade 5 piano until I was 13.

6. I visited Ranthambore national park in India, which is a tiger sanctuary, stayed there for a week and didn’t see a single cat.

7. I don’t like sandwiches.

8. I am proficient in 5 languages: English, German, Ancient Greek, Latin and French

9. I wrote an entire novel when I was 14.

10. I can lucid dream!

Question Time!

1)What was the last movie you can recall that actually really made you laugh as in splitting sides kind of movies?

Hot Fuzz! Basically anything with Simon Pegg…

2] The last book you read that made you stop in your tracks and think about life?

The book that I’m reading right now (stay tuned for a review 🙂  called “All that Remains” by Sue Black. Of course I’ll go into this later, but it’s about Death and how humans really are just an amalgamation of cells and organs. When you examine humans just as another species you realise how personally insignificant you are…which actually quite liberating.

3] What is a piece of music that can make you smile and cry inside at the same time?

Liability by Lorde

4] An event in history that changed your perspective on how we live as a society?

Definitely the Enabling Act in 1933 Germany. It represented the loss of liberty in the German population and signalled that Hitler was starting his dictatorship. With the SS and an ultimate grip on judiciary system, this event proved that the public weren’t complicit in his rise power but simply tried to live their lives and follow along.

This changed my perspective on society because it illustrates that people aren’t inherently evil and that they don’t set out to do bad things. Not all the millions of Germans, for example, even voted him into the government and even if they did, it was his financial policies that were attractive and they tended to ‘overlook’ everything else. People saw strength in Hitler’s passionate speeches, and he represented the strong leader they needed moving on from the Wall Street Crash. No one could see what was coming- if Nigel Farage wrote a massive manifesto, who would bother reading it or even taking it seriously? Yet, if he ends up Prime Minister and initiates outrageously xenophobic policies, then people can say these beliefs were even in his writing all along, and shame on you for missing them. So basically that lots of terrible things happen because of the short-sightedness, and not necessarily maliciousness, of the majority. Like Brexit.

5] Frankenstein or Dracula – who would win that fight and why?

Dracula, because Frankenstein (read my review of it, here) is more emotional and so would unlikely have the capacity to brutally murder Dracula (unless there was a sound reason). Frankenstein wouldn’t fight for the sake of power, whereas Dracula definitely would, because he’s sneaky like that. Frankenstein may have brute strength, but psychologically he is unstable and therefore would struggle with the final blow when not unduly antagonised. Dracula, as we know, is more conniving and thus would win.

6] You only have £5 in your pocket and a homeless person has asked you to spare some change – what do you do? Answer honestly here from your heart – and not what you expect other readers to expect of your answer.

Honestly, if I had spare time for a conversation, I would ask the person what they needed, like if they needed a toothbrush or a sandwich. If they then said that they were hungry, maybe I would buy them a meal from a local supermarket, but if they asked for just money I would walk away, because clearly if they don’t ask for something specific then the money would be going towards something dubious.

7] Which flower or herb do you find startlingly attractive and why?

Lavender… I mean look at this and you’ll see what I mean:

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8] What is your favourite pastel colour?

Apart from lavender? This:

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9] You have the chance to have a dinner party with five of the Harry Potter characters – who would you invite [Dead or Alive]

Ron Weasley

Dobby!

Hagrid

Hermione Granger

Cho Chang

10] In a hundred years what will society miss from our today? 

Society will miss the amount of forest and natural habitat that is somewhat in abundance today, but is slowly being destroyed by deforestation.

11] If you had the ability to stop planet earth right now and start afresh – which would mean that you would cease to exist – would you perform the action?

By “start afresh” I presume a Noah’s Ark type scenario? No, I wouldn’t, because then humanity would be back to square one, without the knowledge which they had gained over the past centuries. Humanity would be so primitive that slavery, homophobia and  misogyny would normal again- society wouldn’t have gone through that learning curve of realising that equality is necessary, so what would essentially happen is that all those groups of people would be targeted again. The minorities would have to suffer for many millennia more because of the archaic power structure that would form again. These people have waited long enough for equality, I’m not going to let them wait anymore by going through the same cycle. People don’t learn from their past mistakes as it is, and with starting afresh these mistakes won’t even be in their memory and so history really would repeat itself. And history is not a nice place to be if you’re a straight white male. No one wants to go back there.

5 blogs that I’m nominating for this award:

11 Random questions for these blogs:

  1. If you were a type of instrument, what type of instrument would you be?
  2.  If you had the attention of the government of your country for a single hour, what would you say to them and why?
  3.  What is more significant, art which makes us laugh, or art which makes us cry?
  4.  What is the one meal that you think everyone should know how to cook?
  5.  If you could do an “exchange” with a person in the past for a year (ignoring the fact you can’t speak the language of the time), who would it be and why. (i.e swap with Julius Caesar for one year, and he would live in your house.)
  6.  What is more important- utilitarianism, or aesthetics?
  7.  If you had the chance to meet Death in person for dinner- without dying because of the encounter- what would you do?
  8.  What is your favourite word?
  9.  Do you think it’s acceptable to take the last slice of pizza? Why/not?
  10.  If after you died you were incarnated into a household object (until it broke/ ran out of battery) which one would you choose to be?
  11. If you had the power to bring back a fad, which one would it be?

List the rules:

Display the picture of the award

  • Thank the person who has nominated you and link to their blog
  • Write a small post about what makes you passionate about blog posting.
  • Write 10 random facts about yourself
  • Answer the questions I’ve asked
  • Nominate blogs that you like and inform them that you have
  • Ask random questions for them
  • List the rules

“We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars”

SEPTEMBER BOOK OF THE BOOK

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When prisoners were asked to rate themselves in terms of how moral, trustworthy, honest, dependable, compassionate, law-abiding, self-controlled, kind to others and generous they were, they said that they were better than average at 8 out of the 9 traits. Let’s read that again. Prisoners charged with violence and theft thought that they were more compassionate than the rest of the population. And had more self-controlled. Right, yes, that totally makes sense.

In fact, the only trait where they didn’t supposedly surpass  the rest of the population with was in ‘law-abidingness’, where they “rated themselves as equally law-abiding”. Which is ironic, as they were the ones behind bars. This phenomenon of wanting to elevate your own status is not new, and the vast majority of people when asked these very questions thought that they too are better than average at practically everything. Yes… I know, the maths for everyone being better than average doesn’t quite add up, does it?

So humanity are keen to establish their superiority over others. But who really are the best, the so-called superhumans of our race, and can we become like them? As Oscar Wilde once famously said:

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No one likes the thought of being sub-par: yes, people are lazy and do things against their self-interest, but there is always a part of them that wants greatness. Fame, money, social recognition. It’s the way contemporary society works, and I am no different. The Ink Cloud hit the Fringe this past August, and during my free time I wandered into Waterstones (surprise surprise) with about £100 worth of book tokens to spend. As some readers may have gathered from my reading choices, I’m extremely interested in sport (namely triathlon). I will be the first to say that I am ambitious person whose overwhelming confidence in certain situations is almost laughable (as you can also probably tell from my posts). Unashamedly, I do want to succeed, especially in triathlon which I train a lot for. So it’s no wonder that Rowan Hooper’s book Superhuman captured my attention. I was drawn to the title and blurb, because I wanted to find out how I too can be like them: there was an attraction finally hearing the secret of how to be superior. It sounds unattractive perhaps, but I bet you feel the same way, too. Deep down. Don’t deny it.

In the book, Hooper finds those who excel in various walks in life, whether it’s their ability to be supremely intelligent, fast, resilient or even happy. There are many interviews and scientific studies, as well as witty quips. Admittedly, I’m a sucker for well-designed book cover, and the sprinter on the front really did it for me. Because if I’m going to part with £20 for a book, it may as well look classy. Right? Anyway, I was hoping to come to Superhuman to find some secret, some little insight into how I could reach the level of sporting success that I crave. Maybe ‘crave’ is the wrong word, because I train copiously everyday, so it’s not like I just sit in bed and hope for it. But you see what I mean.

Thus the main message behind Superhuman, I can exclusively reveal, is that genetics is at play. A could be called a useful catalyst. Nice to have, sure, but not essential. This is because time and time again it was actually hard work that was the driving force the success people experienced. Yes, elite runners with innate talent may have learnt to walk a little faster, but talent hadn’t woken them up at 5AM so that they can go to a pre-school training. What I took away from it all was:

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But I knew that anyway, and you probably did too. Yet reading this book was nevertheless genuinely enjoyable and hearing about all these successful people truly drove that message home.